Floodwaters are rising all across Belize tonight, in the West, North and Central parts of the country. 7News has deployed teams to these areas and we start in Crooked Tree Village where that community is now an isolated island depending on boats to ferry in relief supplies and ferry out many of the over one thousand residents who work and go to school in the city:

Jules Vasquez reporting
The Crooked Tree Lagoon is like a vast lake, coming up on two meters above the usual height - and the water keeps going up. The causeway is buried in the depths and is now just a way station - a transfer point between buses and boats.

Jules Vasquez
"Explain to me what people are facing on a day to day basis?"

Darrell Tillett, Village Council Chairman
"People are facing a real difficult time especially the students and the commuters who go to and from the village to Belize City."

Now life in the village has come to depend on the boats, 3 of them shuttling across the flooded area every day.

It's about a mile and the boats have to transport 190 persons daily including 85 students back and forth, leaving as early as 4:30 am and the last coming in at 7:00 0 under the cover of darkness.

Those who can't catch a boat, must do what we saw these men doing today - walk into water waist deep across a mile of water. This military truck tried to do it today - it was coming full with supplies, but it got stuck.

Those supplies were brought in by boat and ended up here at the Crooked Tree museum village gift shop - that has turned into a supply hub for villagers. They've been crying out for Mr. Nemo and he came through today in the presence of Belize Rural North Coordinator Calbert Budd:

Calbert Budd, NEMO Coordinator
"What happen is that they all sit back and wanted me to come over here and do their work and then they call me and tell me that they are going on the media, so I tell them whenever you go on the media then I will let the media know that you all are at fault."

"This community has been trained; they have village community for disaster management. They were trained by JICA, they have a set of CDRTs that were trained by the Red Cross and they all know their duties and responsibilities."

Jules Vasquez
"So the community has failed?"

Calbert Budd, NEMO Coordinator
"They have failed."

But those hard feelings are mostly behind them now, NEMO is on the ground and doing a survey of the village.

Darrell Tillett, Village Council Chairman
"We've been lobbying and Mr. Castro and NEMO, they came through for us."

Jules Vasquez
"So what are the greatest needs in this community right now?"

Darrell Tillett, Village Council Chairman
"The basic needs like food stuff, we have running water but people still wants drinking water."

Jules Vasquez
"Explain the problem?"

Darrell Tillett, Village Council Chairman
"It affects everybody, but right now we are trying to focus on the people on the low laying area and we are doing an assessment right now. More stuff are going to come in."

Jules Vasquez
"How many people are you catering for right now?"

Calbert Budd, NEMO Coordinator
"Presently I am catering for 201 families today."

Jules Vasquez
"201 families - that's about 800 people."

Calbert Budd, NEMO Coordinator
"Between 700 and 800 people."

Today residents got basic food and cleaning supplies and NEMO says they will continue to assist, but just looking at the lagoon, that assistance will have to continue for a while, possibly into early next year.

Crooked Tree is having a village meeting at 7:30 tonight. From that community, NEMO has received reports that 9 head of cattle have been lost. Apart from that there has been no serious threat to public safety in the village, though there have been a few cases of damage to property in flooded area. The last time the village had an epic flood was in 2008 and Claudeth Adolphus who was living at the water's edge said that this time is not nearly as bad:

Claudeth Adolphus, resident
"This flood right now is nothing compared to 2008."

Jules Vasquez
"How was 2008 flood worse, like specifically how?"

Claudeth Adolphus, resident
"Because I used to live at the lagoon front and it came so rash. I went to bed that night and when I woke up the water was on my bed, I said its not time to panic because I had my kids with me (put your head on your body and think what to do). I said to myself that if I should get material things in life again, so shall it be on to me. I packed up clothes and I called the chairman and I told him that I really need to get shelter because I am in trouble down here (I am a single mother), so he gave me the keys for community center to go and sleep. I went there and NEMO and Human Services came to my rescue and everything just came back to me. I just thank God to be here today."

The village chairman says if you want to help, the students really need rubber boots and food and supplies are always welcome. Remember, the village causeway is likely to remain flooded until early next year. Those who'd like to help can call the Chairman at 604-1648.

Channel 7