Who can forget last year when 13 babies died inside the Karl Heusner Memorial Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit?

Well, 5 out of the 13 families took the hospital to court and sued them. That case ended today without going to the Supreme Court, instead, it went through the new mediation process. After more than a year and a half refusing to accept blame for the babies, the Hospital will now be doing so in the form of an apology, and an award of damages.

7News was outside of court when that resolution was reached, and we spoke to both parties about its significance:

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"We arrived at a settlement but we cannot disclose anything about it, it's all confidential."

Reporter
"Are both parties satisfied sir?"

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"I imagine so."

Geovannie Brackett
"Do you feel that the compensation was satisfactory?"

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"Cannot comment."

Kareem Musa - Attorney for Grieving Mothers
"I will agree that in fact settlement was arrived at. All the parties discussed it. There was a back and forth and at the end of the day I think all the parties are satisfied. Certainly it can be argued that litigation fatigue set in. As you know these mothers have been going through a lot over the last year and a half since losing their children at the hospital and the process only brings it back. Each and every time they have to go through these lengthy processes here at the court I think they just want to put it behind them. And certainly that is what was done today. An apology will be coming from the hospital - that's part of the settlement and there was a financial award and of course I can't discuss that but those are the terms of the agreement and I said the parties are happy and they are satisfied and they are moving on with their lives."

"Had it gone to full trial I believe that they may have gotten a little more, but certainly it is within the range. No amount of money can bring back their children. I think that we have to realize that this thing is more emotional than anything else, and all they really wanted from the hospital was an apology, so whether it was one dollar or a million dollars, it never mattered to them in the first place. They felt disrespected, they felt that the hospital just threw them under the bus and this was an opportunity for them to vent, and certainly this was one of the reasons we took so long in the conference room, because they had that opportunity to vent, and it was very emotional, very traumatic but I think they do not want to have to go through this any longer. They just want their children to pass with dignity."

As noted in the story, the parties cannot disclose the details of the settlement and resolution. And while that resolution is at the front and centre, in the periphery is CEO Gary Longsworth departure from KHMH. As we've told you, he ran the hospital since 2008, but his tenure in the office, even with all the advances and good work that the hospital made, is forever marred by those baby deaths. Today, we asked him about the details of his exit. He was very brief with us:

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"I believe at the end of September."

Reporter
"Your replacement?"

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"No my replacement has not been chosen yet."

Daniel Ortiz
"Are you satisfied with the service you provided as CEO?"

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"More than satisfied, thank you."

Reporter
"Do you think you will be missed?"

Dr. Gary Longsworth - CEO, KHMH
"Time will tell."

Channel 7