Belize~Mon. May, 17, 2004 ~ Sea Adventures

Mr. Eg interrupts deep sleep. My presence is requested. Miguel is here. As I stumble into the kitchen a wondrous sight greets me. The bar is lined with the conch shells and they are, indeed, beautiful.

I race to the porch and Miguel gets a really, big, huge hug. Eyes light up and he shows pleasure that his labor has produced such results. He refuses payment for his service. I whisper a word to D. and he goes inside and quickly returns. We enjoy coffee together and as Miguel is leaving a bill is pressed into his hand with a thank-you handshake. It is not refused. He is also given the combo meal from BCís. I know there is enough that his wife will not have to cook a noon meal.

The sky is lightening. It is still overcast but the sun seems to be trying to peek through in a few spots. Hope is held out that we can snorkel. This is the last chance. The dive bag is packed, sunscreen liberally applied and swimsuits are put on. A T-shirt is put into the dive bag, too. We wait. 9:00 a.m. comes and goes. We wait. Struggling sunlight is breaking through the clouds. Finally, Tulu is spied coming along the beach. He seems doubtful about going out today. Well, sir, weíre game if you are! In moments, the bag is grabbed; we are on the Janelle and she is soon plowing through the waves to the northern side of the island. Tulu points out sights of interest. There is the Palapa Bar. Tres Coco is passed and we learn it was named for three large coconut trees that stood on the beach. They are no longer there compliments of a hurricane that blew them down.

In due time, Mexico Rocks is reached and the anchor dropped. Gear is prepped and donned. This time I wear a T-shirt. The back must be protected. It is hoped the rains havenít churned up the water and limited visibility. An ungraceful entry is made into the sea. I have got to learn how to make that backward roll from the side of the boat.

WOW! The water is a bit cool. Mexico Rocks is a patch reef. The coral formations have spaces of sandy bottom covered in Turtle Grass between them. The reef is beautiful with multitudes of fish. Only once, I spot a patch of bright blue coral and another that is lemon yellow.



Having been in the water awhile, Iím becoming cold and goose bumps rise on my skin. Efforts are concentrated on conserving energy in an attempt to remain in the water as long as possible. It is so stunning I hesitate to give up.

All of the sudden something nips my leg! I rise to see Mr. Eg having a good laugh and Tulu is joining him. Believe me, choice words can be said while wearing a mask and snorkel. Maybe he should be kept in view at all times.



Fire Coral


I begin to think itís time to head for the boat. Just as Iím about to tell them I am going in, they are not in sight. As the boat ladder is reached, Tulu is suddenly alongside and looking a little worried. Iím fine and just need to warm up. He seems concerned about the climb up the ladder. Unknown to Tulu, I have been getting in and out of boats since childhood. It may have been awhile, but the technique is not forgotten. Mr. Eg has also appeared and we board. Those two had found a Puffer Fish and a little panic set in when they couldnít locate me. Darn it! I missed seeing a Puffer! We warm ourselves, munch on watermelon and visit.