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Links to Satellite and Hurricane Data

Archives

NEMO Damage Assessment and Needs Analysis HURRICANE RICHARD,
BELIZE HURRICANE SEASON 2007
Hurricane Mitch Archive
Hurricane Vulnerability in the Caribbean (pdf)
Hurricane Archive, Keith, Chantal, Iris
Make sure you set drop down box on
upper right to "Show all topics"
Pictures of Ambergris Caye after Hurricane Keith
Pictures of Caye Caulker after Hurricane Keith
Hurricane Tracking Map for Belize
Stormtracks since 1851 for Ambergris Caye
Pictures of Ambergris Caye taken right before Hurricane Chantal
Photos of Big Falls area after Hurricane Iris
Photos of several Toledo area villages after Hurricane Iris
Photos of Placencia after Hurricane Iris
Castles in the Sand
Hurricane Hattie on Ambergris Caye, by Angel Nunez
Hurricane Hattie by Don Severo
Hurricane Hattie by John Friesen
Remembering: Hurricane Hattie 50 Years Ago
Eighteenth century hurricanes in Central America

When hurricane season is here, keep an eye out here for updates if the local weather situation becomes more tense. Click the link above for the Belize Hurricane Net, and for satellite and weather links relative to hurricanes in the Belize/Caribbean area, for general information on hurricanes, or for information on joining our network.
Here you can see all stormtracks since 1851 for Ambergris Caye. In the climatology section there is also a weekly analysis of the data which shows when the real peak of hurricane season is for Ambergris Caye and a five-year analysis to find out if more storms have passed close by Ambergris Caye recently.

http://stormcarib.com/climatology/MZAC_all_isl.htm
http://stormcarib.com/climatology/MZAC_dec_isl.htm
http://stormcarib.com/climatology/MZAC_weekly.htm
http://stormcarib.com/climatology/MZAC_5year.htm

The winds of your garden variety hurricane are generally not the source of dangerous damage to modern construction. Blowing debris, tree limbs, and such can be a problem, but they're not life-threatening. The "art deco" rounded-corner architecture of Miami was adopted largely because winds tend to get funneled and intensified in municipal concrete canyons, and vortices that can form on sharp corners can actually pull a building down. But in New Orleans, where I lived for 26 years, hurricanes with winds under 100 knots, sufficient to close the schools and workplaces, were considered a great opportunity to catch up on your sunbathing and take outdoor showers -- hurricane rain is pretty warm except near the eye.

The wind danger from hurricanes is from spinoff tornadoes, which are most common in the northeast and, second, the southwest quadrants in our latitudes. Those are rather like lightning -- hit you, or don't, low probability of the former, but if it happens, you just get very impressed.

Of course, a monster like Mitch, sporting tornado-force winds in the main body of the hurricane, is something to be far away from and not fool with. Personally, when a storm with wind forces much over 100 knots aims its center at me, I start thinking Rocky Mountain vacation and boogie. If one with big strong winds is passing anywhere close, I boogie sooner.

Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale
Category Wind speeds
Five 70 m/s
137 kts
157 mph
252 km/h
Four 58-70 m/s
113–136 kts
130–156 mph
209–251 km/h
Three 50-58 m/s
96–112 kts
111–129 mph
178–208 km/h
Two 43-49 m/s
83–95 kts
96–110 mph
154–177 km/h
One 33-42 m/s
64–82 kts
74–95 mph
119–153 km/h
Additional classifications
Tropical
storm
18-32 m/s
35–63 kts
39–73 mph
63–118 km/h
Tropical
depression
<17 m/s
<34 kts
<38 mph
<62 km/h
The reason is, as you mention, the water. If you live in the highlands, water damage from a hurricane comes with very heavy rainfall, the gullies along the creekbanks, where people live, filling up and flushing everything away. Humans tending to clear vegetation where they live, mudslides become a very important factor. Neither North Carolina (Dennis, Floyd et als.) nor Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador, and parts of Guatemala (Mitch) are ever going to get their old geography back.

Down here a couple of cat jumps above sea level, rain's no problem because to make the water rise the clouds have to fill up the ocean. On the mainland, runoff from the hills can put the surf up pretty well in the river flood plains, but once the rivers are out of their banks, they have to spread out very widely and can't come up much more. Wet feet, drinking water, and snake etiquette are your major problems.

The real problem on a coastline or island is waves and storm tides. These have two factors. One is the surface wave action, just the water blown by the storm winds. Waves can bash down anything they don't lift up and carry away. The other is tides, and storm tides have two general causes. One is the cumulative effect of all that wind pushing all that water in a particular direction for a long time. If it pushes it toward land, it has to pile up when it hits the coastal incline along the shore. Up the ramp and over she goes. The other becomes important if the eye is nearby. The low pressure area that defines a hurricane acts somewhat like a straw in operation in a malted milk shake. It elevates the surface of the liquid involved. It makes a local hill of water. When that's being heaved around, of course the tides are higher. Add such solar and lunar effects as may be happening simultaneously, and, if they're generating high tides when your storm is nearby, sea level is up several feet anyway, sometimes in hefty double digits.

Add all this together and our protection by the reef, in fact anyone's protection by any seawall artificial or natural, can be partially overwhelmed. Our reef saves us from utter devastation in big storms and, unlike practically any artificial arrangement, it isn't going to be undercut and washed away. Most of the wave force slams into it and goes straight up in the air. Sixty feet or more sometimes. Quite a sight. But if the tides are high, the tops of the waves come over -- the reef is invisible, submerged, and, wind-driven in the shallow pan of the lagoon, waves give the windward shoreline a considerable pounding. The result is adios to the piers and anything built on them and damage to construction on the beachfront. Mitch never got closer than about 200 miles away, but was such a monster it generated waves that did that much. Hattie, a long time ago, passing virtually over San Pedro, put water over the surface of the island in most places, with waves on top. Still, there were no Hattie deaths in San Pedro, as far as I know. Most of the people rode it out: warning was not that early, and evacuation would have been mostly by sailboat. No, thanks.

On this island, we're in a position hurricanes tend to miss and bypass. When people ask me whether I worry about hurricanes, I point out I moved here from New Orleans -- old Ground Zero, the Catcher's Mitt. And so, the reef provides adequate and very much appreciated protection most storm seasons. With sparse insurance facilities, people build expensive things here, get away with it, and expect to continue doing so indefinitely, or at least long enough to recover investments.

All together now, boats and hurricanes. The old island expedient is probably the best. For a moderate blow, take your boat around on the back side and anchor it. For a heavier one, find a good mangrove thicket and ram your boat up in there as far as you can. Then tie it off with long, emphasis LONG, strong lines. The mangrove is going to bend around a lot and break up wind and wave action. But you want your lines long because in case of a high tide, your boat is going to ride up. You do want to tie off to the strong trunks of the mangroves, not the flimsy upper branches, but you don't want the bow of your boat pointing down into the wind and waves, do you? The fellow with the houseboat, a Cajun and therefore experienced waterman immigrant, planned to ride out Mitch just so, if it came closer. People with bigger or deeper-draft boats often scurry for mainland havens, but the mangrove expedient is probably better. With development, though, mangrove is not as plentiful as it used to be. You want to pick your spot before the time comes, and then crank up and move quickly enough to get there first.

Which leads to the most important hurricane thing I can think of: early evacuation. Far too many people tend to wait and see before bugging out, and then all want to go in the final hours. I think it's a plot to drown husbands and brothers. The reason is, if the planes, boats, etc. whereby one can evacuate are all full on the last haul, the women and children are going and the men are going to stay and gargle. Ambergris Caye got caught about 2,000 bug-outs short when planes and boats couldn't do it any more, despite literally heroic work by aviators and boat pilots. Those who stayed were just lucky Mitch didn't come any closer than it did. Since then, preparation programs have been much improved. It may be many years before such a situation presents itself again, or it could happen this year. But I sincerely hope it's been established the women and children are going to get out of here early in the "wait and see" period to make room for the men on the last floats and flights out.

But, then, we rarely have forest fires or earthquakes and other California delights. Our rare tornadoes are waterspouts, which have a curious custom of lifting up and hopping over land -- why, I don't know, but it's quite reliable, I've seen it. So if you come here, afloat or ashore, you're probably taking a step up in overall safety. Besides, in contrast to forest fires and earthquakes, the approach or aftermath of a storm brings world class fishing! Trophies off the dock, if the dock's still there! Those big waterdwelling professionals think that reef is just the ticket!

John Lankford

Hurricane Preparedness Guidelines

Historically, 90 percent of all hurricane casualties have occurred from drowning and 10 percent from other causes. Therefore, it is imperative that all persons should evacuate cayes, beaches and other locations which may be swept by high tides or storm waves. Evacuate to a recommended place of refuge.

Remember that the highest tide occurs during the second half of the storm and that the rise of the water may take place very rapidly immediately following the eye of the storm or the time of the lowest barometric pressure. If your only passage to high ground is over a road subject to flooding, leave early. Do not run the risk of being marooned or having to evacuate at the height of the storm amid flying debris.

Hurricane Safety Rules:

  1. Stay tuned to radio and television stations for regular bulletins.
  2. Rely only on official bulletins; do not check these over the telephone.
  3. As long as your house is inland and well built-with strong foundations and a good roof, stay at home.
  4. Use storm shutters or board windows securely, Protect outward door.
  5. Stock up on food which has a long shelf life.
  6. Check that oil and butane stoves are in working order- replenish stock of kerosene, charcoal and butane.
  7. Sterilize baths; all containers and cooking utensils to store water. If in doubt, drink boiled or
    treated water only.
  8. Keep flashlights, candies and storm lanterns handy along with batteries and matches.
  9. Store all garden implements and furniture inside if possible.
  10. Lighten foliage of fruit trees near buildings. If very strong winds are likely, remove all coconuts.
  11. If you are evacuating, leave early so that you are not stranded by flooded roads, fallen trees, wires and traffic jams and make sure you have enough fuel in your vehicle and follow routes and highways.
  12. If there is a lull after the 'eye' of the storm has passed, stay in a safe place, except to make emergency repairs. The wind may return suddenly with even greater strength.
  13. Since 90 percent of hurricane casualties occur from drowning, you must evacuate islands and beaches and other vulnerable locations as early as possible.
  14. Those seeking shelter should shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving home.

Note: Pets are not allowed at shelters, you need to make your own arrangements for the safety of your pets.

PET PROTECTION

Pet owners are responsible for disaster planning for their pet. If you plan to evacuate, plan for your pet as well. Take your pet Survival Kit if you go to friends, relatives or a hotel. Shelters cannot accept pets. So if you plan to go to a public shelter, make the required provisions for your pet/s.

After the storm has passed, be careful in allowing your pet outdoors. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet could easily be confused and become lost. Downed power lines, and animals and insects brought in with high water, could present real dangers to your pet. Take care not to allow your pet to consume food or water which may have become contaminated.

PET SURVIVAL KIT:

  1. Proper ID collar and rabies tag
  2. Carrier or cage
  3. Leash
  4. Food Supply
  5. Water/food bowl
  6. Medication, if necessary
  7. Specific care instructions

Assembling a Disaster Kit

Assemble supplies you might need in an evacuation. Store them in an easy-to-carry container such as a backpack or duffle bag.

Include:

  1. A supply of water (one gallon per person per day).
  2. Store water in sealed, unbreakable container.
  3. Identify the storage date and replace every six months.
  4. A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  5. Blankets or sleeping bags.
  6. A first aid kit and prescription medication.
  7. A battery-powered radio, flashlight and plenty of extra batteries.
  8. Special items for infants, elderly or disabled family members.
  9. Sanitary supplies i.e, toilet paper; feminine supplies and soap.
  10. Personal identification documents such as passports, birth certificates, residency cards etc.

Belize District


The annual Atlantic Hurricane Season is June 1 to November 30 each year. Plan now. If your home is located in an area vulnerable to flooding, storm surge, or higher-than-normal winds or if your may not be able to withstand high winds even though it may not be in a vulnerable area, you should plan to evacuate in the event of a hurricane or severe storm.

The first point is to stay with friends or relatives whose homes are strong enough. If you must, then you may go to a public shelter. Learn where your shelters are located.

Hurricane or Storm Watch


If Belize District is placed under a Storm or Hurricane Watch, the cyclone may strike within 24 - 36 hours. You should take appropriate precautions immediately.

Hurricane or Storm Warning

When a Hurricane or Storm Warning is issued, the cyclone is expected to strike within 24 hours, and you must plan to leave if you are in a vulnerable area or your home cannot withstand the winds.

Before Evacuating:

Leave as early as possible
It is advised that you begin evacuation procedures before an evacuation order is given. This will allow you more time to calmly get to a home of a friend or relative that is not in a vulnerable area. Please remember to take with you an emergency suitcase (see list) of essential hurricane supplies, such as identification and prescription medicine. Shelters will not open until an evacuation order is given. Space in public shelters is limited.

Pack an Emergency Suitcase to Take to a Shelter
The suitcase or bag should be light enough to carry to a shelter and it should include the following items:

For further information contact NEMO or your District Emergency Organization.

Ambergris Caye and Caye Caulker, Belize District

Activities of the District Emergency Coordinator

NEMO District Coordinator
Mrs. Augustine, tiimrose_a@yahoo.com

Official Hurricane Shelters

After the Storm

  1. Remain at home or in the shelter until informed that it is safe to leave.
  2. Keep tuned to the radio for instructions.
  3. Beware of loose wires and report them immediately to the police of fire departments, or Belize Electricity Limited.
  4. Stay out of disaster areas, damaged buildings and flooded areas.
  5. Take extra fire precautions.
  6. Report broken sewers and mains to the Belize Water Services Limited.
  7. Check refrigerated food for spoilage.
  8. Drive carefully - roads may have been substantially weakened.
  9. Listen to the radio for information about:

What Is A Tropical Wave, Depression, Tropical Storm Or A Hurricane:
Storm categories

Tropical Wave
A cluster of clouds and/or thunderstorms without a significant circulation and generally moving from east to west through the tropics

Tropical Depression
A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained wind speed is 38 mph or less ( less than 33 kt or 17 m/s). Depressions have a closed circulation.

Tropical Storm
A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained wind speed ranges from 39 mph (34 kt or 18 m/s) to 73 mph (63 kt or 33 m/s). The convection in tropical storms is usually more concentrated near the center with outer rainfall organizing into distinct bands.

Hurricane
When winds in a tropical cyclone equal or exceed 74 mph (64 kt or 34 m/s) it is called a hurricane. Hurricanes are further designated by categories on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Hurricanes in categories 3, 4, 5 are known as Major Hurricanes or Intense Hurricanes.

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale:

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a 1-5 rating based on the hurricane's present intensity. This is used to give an estimate of the potential property damage and flooding expected along the coast from a hurricane landfall. Wind speed is the determining factor in the scale, as storm surge values are highly dependent on the slope of the continental shelf in the landfall region. Note that all winds are using the U.S. 1-minute average.

Category One Hurricane:
Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). Barometric Pressure Above 980 mb (Above 28.94 in) Storm surge generally 4-5 ft above normal. No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage.

Category Two Hurricane:
Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt or 154-177 km/hr). Barometric Pressure 965-980 mb (28.50-28.94 in) Storm surge generally 6-8 feet above normal. Some roofing material, door, and window damage of buildings. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to mobile homes, poorly constructed signs, and piers. Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of the hurricane center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings.

Category Three Hurricane:
Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr). Barometric Pressure 945-965 mb (27.91-28.50 in) Storm surge generally 9-12 ft above normal. Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by battering from floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland 8 miles (13 km) or more. Evacuation of low-lying residences with several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Category Four Hurricane:
Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr). Barometric Pressure 920-945 mb (27.17-27.91 in) Storm surge generally 13-18 ft above normal. More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows. Low-lying escape routes may be cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain lower than 10 ft above sea level may be flooded requiring massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 miles (10 km).

Category Five Hurricane:
Winds greater than 155 mph (greater than 135 kt or 249 km/hr). Barometric Pressure Below 920 mb (Below 27.17 in) Storm surge generally greater than 18 ft above normal. Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 ft above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles (8-16 km) of the shoreline may be required.

Hurricane Tracking Map for Belize + Flag system for warnings

HURRICANE STATISTICS FOR BELIZE

( H for hit, T for light touch.)

             1945 - 2 un-named 
             1950 - 1953 None 
             1954 - Gilda (T) 
             1955 - 1959 none 
             1960 - Abby (TS) 
             1961 - Anna (H), Hattie (H) 
             1962 - 1968 none 
             1969 - Francelia (H) Barely touching the southern tip of Belize 
             1970 - none 
             1971 - Chloe (T), Edith (H), Laura (T) 
             1972 - 1973 None 
             1974 - Fifi (H), Carmen (H) Barely touching the northern Tip of Belize 
             1975 - 1976 None 
             1977 - Freida (T) 
             1978 - Greta (H) 
             1979   None 
             1980 - Hermine (T) 
             1981 - 1992 None 
             1993 - Gert (T) 
             1994 - 1999 None 
             2000 - Keith (H) 
             2001 - Iris (H), Chantal (T) Barely touching the northern tip of Belize 
			 2005 - Emily (T), Wilma (T)'
			 2010 - Richard (H)
              
             Hurricanes with direct impact since 1951 
              
             1961 = 2 
             1971 = 1 
             1974 = 1 
             1978 = 1 
             2000 = 1 
             2001 = 1
             2010 = 1
			 

Click here for information on hurricanes in the Belize area from the mid 1700's to the mid 1850's.

Belize tropical systems:

Tropical Storm to Hurricane ratio: TS=27, 55.10% H=22, 44.89%

Longest gap between storms: 9 years 1906-1916

How often this area gets affected? Brushed or hit every 2.86 years

Average years between direct hurricane hits. (Hurricane force winds for a few hours): (21h) once every 6.67 years

Average MPH of hurricane hits. (based on advisories sustained winds, not gusts): 102mph

Statistically when this area should be affected next: Before the end of 2014

Last affected by: 2011 Aug 20th Tropical storm Harvey hits south of Belize City with 65mph winds.

Belize hurricane past

1864 Aug 31st a 5 ft tide inundated the town 80mph.

1892 Oct 12th 95mph from the ESE

1893 July 6th 90mph from the S.E north part of country

1906 Oct 13th, 80mph from the SSE

1918 Aug 26th 80mph from the east

1931 Sept 10th a hurricane with 125mph just north of Belize city 132mph for 10 min 1,500 killed.

1933 Sept 12th, 80mph very north tip of country from the SSE

1934 June 8th, 80mph mainly offshore islands affected from the south

1941 Sept 28th,85mph from the ESE south part of country

1942 Nov 8th, 95mph north part of country from the east

1945 Oct 4th,85mph from the east

1955 Major Hurricane Janet levels the area Sept 27th , Corozal Town destroyed with 160mph winds (914mb). Belize damage shot Hurricane hunter aircraft Snowcloud Five lost & never found.

1960 July 15th ,75mph winds Hurricane Abby from the east south part of country

1961 July 24th Hurricane Anna 80mph moving west

1961 Oct 31st, Hurricane Hattie hits just south with 27.17 press 150mph winds with gusts to 200mph an 13ft storm surge kills 275 as 75% of area is destroyed

1969 Hurricane Francelia hits southern Belize with 90mph winds on sept 4th from the east.

1974 Sept 2nd Hurricane Carmen hits the north part of country with 125mph winds from the east

1974 Sept 19th, Hurricane Fifi 105mph ,85 to 100kt winds reported here,tides 10 to 12 ft.

1978 Sept 19th Hurricane Greta a cat borderline cat 3 115mph from the ESE.

Oct 1st, 2000 Hurricane Keith hit the areas of Belize city & North.Sat just offshore as a cat 4 135mph winds,then slowly moved S.W nearing Belize city with 75mph winds. Heavy damage on offshore islands & heavy flooding as 2 ft of water was standing in belize city.Chetumal Bay emptied out due to strong north winds.

Oct 8th 2001, Hurricane Iris hits southern Belize with 145mph winds causing major damage as nearly 95% of buildings were heavily damaged. A 14 ft storm surge was reported & 31 killed as 20 of those were people on a dive boat.This was a very small hurricane with hurricane force winds extending out around 20 miles from the center. Total damage estimated at 66 million.

2010 Oct 24th Hurricane Richard comes ashore just south of Belize City as a cat 1 with 90mph winds. Flooding in many homes in Belize City but no deaths.

Comment from a long time Caye Caulker resident...

Sheeeet! So, where is Hurricane FIFI in all that data? I lost three boats, only one was left, plus Caye Caulker town lost its beach, about a 100 feet of it, plus sand to a depth of 4 feet. Of what use is incomplete data, you get errnoneous conclusions.

I know why! There was no wind damage. But we got 14 foot waves, ( tsunami type ) hitting under our house, about 90 feet from the water edge then normal. My boats disappeared. The kids grandfather, Valentine Alamina lost his general grocery store and house, all the piers and docks out front disappeared. The government is building back the beach now, we lost in Hattie and Fifi. Thats a long time to wait, especially when desk bound bureaucrats don´t consider what they don´t see as important. The town of Caye Caulker finished losing over a 100 feet of beach and right of way, plus beach street, plus to a depth of about four feet of sand. It would help each year pre HURRICANE SEASON if they went and took photographs of the inhabited islands, so they have before and after pictures to compare waterlines, damage and buildings.

I never could get anybody in the Belize government to recognize that Hurricane Fifi was disastrous to us on the island. They didn´t care. The EYE passed southward a 180 miles away, but we got the hurricane surge and tsunami effect on the islands.

When and Where Do Hurricanes Occur?

Hurricanes (by whatever name) are by far most common in the Pacific Ocean, with the western Pacific being most active. In some years, the Philippines are struck by more than 20 tropical storms and typhoons. The term applied to various storms depends on their location. Only one hurricane force storm has ever occurred in the South Atlantic - Hurricane "Catarina" in 2004.

World Map

Below is a map showing where each tropical cyclone has tracked between 1851 and 2007... use our Interactive Tracker to plot the storms on top of road and aerial maps.

When hurricanes strike is also determined by location. Below is a brief description of each basin's "hurricane season." More information can be obtained from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ.

ATLANTIC: Hurricane season in the Atlantic runs from June 1 to November 30. Storms outside of these dates are not unheard of. As you can see from the graph, based on the average of 150 years of storms, activity ramps up in August, and peaks once in early September, then again in October. More statistics are available here. Persons traveling to areas near the Atlantic Basin should exercise caution during the entire Hurricane Season.

EASTERN PACIFIC: The Eastern Pacific basin's hurricane season is from May 15th to November 30th, peaking in late August or early September.

WESTERN PACIFIC: The Western Pacific basin's hurricane season is mostly from July 1 to November 30, peaking in late August or early September, though storms can occur year-round.

SOUTH PACIFIC: The South Pacific basin's hurricane season is from October 15 to May 15, reaching a peak in late February or early March.

INDIAN OCEAN: The Indian basin's hurricane season is from April 1 to December 31 for the northern Indian Ocean, and from October 15 to May 31 in the southern region.

What Are the Parts of a Hurricane?

Cross-Section of a Hurricane

1. Outflow

The high level clouds moving clockwise out away from the hurricane at heights of over 35,000 feet. These clouds are indicative of air spreading out over the top of the storm, which is essential to its development.

2. Feeder Bands

These are squally bands of showers characterized by strong gusty winds and heavy rains. These bands become more pronounced as the storm intensifies, and are fed by the warm ocean.

3. The Eyewall

A band of clouds, strong winds and heavy rains surrounding the eye of the storm. At the eyewall, there is rapid movement of air toward the center and upward into the cloud.

4. The Eye

What goes up must come down, so with the violent rising air converging toward the storm center at the eye, sinking air develops within. This air dries out, creating the clear, calm eye. Winds are very light here since the focus of convergence and hence strong winds are in the eyewall.

The Storm Surge

Low pressure in the hurricane can act as a plunger, slightly pulling up the water level. However, the components that contribute to the greatest storm surge affect are the winds blowing to the left side of the storm and the topography of the land as the storm makes land fall. The strongest surge comes ashore just to the right of the eye, where the fierce hurricane winds are blowing toward land. Winds on the left side of the storm might actually cause the water level to run slightly lower than normal. Higher water level allows waves to strike farther inland, causing massive property damage.

NAMED TROPICAL CYCLONES WHICH CAME WITHIN 100 MILES 
OF BELIZE CITY OR HAD SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS ON BELIZE    
COUNT
NAME
DATE
 DISTANCE
 CATEGORY
INTENSITY   
  AT
LANDFALL
DESCRIPTION OF EVENT
1
NOT NAMED
1889-09-17
33 
H.Cat.2 
85
-
2
NOT NAMED
1892-10-12
8 
H.Cat.1
75
-
3
NOT NAMED
1893-07-07
24 
T.S.
35
-
4
NOT NAMED
1898-09-16
40 
T.S.
50
-
5
NOT NAMED
1898-11-03
43 
T.S.
50
-
6
NOT NAMED
1900-10-08
86 
T.S.
40
-
7
NOT NAMED
1902-06-20
38 
T.S.
40
-
8
NOT NAMED
1916-09-02
50 
H.Cat.1 
65
-
9
NOT NAMED
1916-10-15
87 
H.Cat.2 
85
-
10
NOT NAMED
1918-08-26
50 
T.S.
55
-
11
NOT NAMED
1921-06-17
30 
T.S.
35
-
12
NOT NAMED
1922-06-13
100 
T.S.
35
-
13
NOT NAMED
1924-06-18
35 
T.S.
35
-
14
NOT NAMED
1931-07-12
51 
T.S.
40
-
15
NOT NAMED
1931-08-16
30 
T.S.
40
-
16
NOT NAMED
1931-09-10
18 
H.Cat.3
110
-
17
NOT NAMED
1931-09-14
72 
T.S.
60
-
18
NOT NAMED
1932-10-01
26 
T.S.
40
-
19
NOT NAMED
1932-10-10
21 
T.S.
40
-
20
NOT NAMED
1933-09-12
44 
H. Cat.1
65
-
21
NOT NAMED
1933-09-30
45 
T.S.
35
-
22
NOT NAMED
1934-06-05
12 
T.S.
40
-
23
NOT NAMED
1936-06-12
70 
T.S.
35
-
24
NOT NAMED
1938-10-11
13 
T.S.
40
-
25
NOT NAMED
1939-06-12
13 
T.S.
35
-
26
NOT NAMED
1940-09-21
32 
T.S.
40
-
27
NOT NAMED
1941-09-28
84 
H.Cat.1 
80
-
28
NOT NAMED
1942-09-22
17 
T.S.
35
-
29
NOT NAMED
1942-11-09
29 
H.Cat.2 
85
-
30
NOT NAMED
1943-10-22
48 
T.S.
40
-
31
NOT NAMED
1945-08-31
24 
T.S
35
-
32
NOT NAMED
1945-10-04
66 
H.Cat.1 
70
-
33
NOT NAMED
1946-10-05
65 
T.S.
35
-
34
GILDA
1954-09-27
44 
T.S.
60
-
35
JANET
1955-09-28
60 
H. Cat.5 
165
-
36
ABBY
1960-07-15
64 
H. Cat.1 
65
-
37
ANNA
1961-07-24
54 
H. Cat.1 
70
-
38
HATTIE
1961-10-31
19 
H. Cat.4 
140
News 1
News 2
News 3
News 4
39
FRANCELIA
1969-09-03
74 
H. Cat.2 
85
-
40
EDITH
1971-09-11
26 
T.S.
60
-
41
LAURA
1971-11-20
34 
T.S.
60
-
42
CARMEN
1974-09-02
68 
H. Cat.3 
120
-
43
FIFI
1974-09-19
72 
H. Cat.2 
90
 
44
GRETA
1978-09-19
30 
H. Cat.2 
95
 
45
HERMINE
1980-09-22
29 
T.S.
60
 
46
GERT
1993-09-18
13 
T.S.
35
 
47
KYLE
1996-10-12
67 
T.S.
45
 
48
MITCH
1998-10-27
*150 
H. Cat.5      
155
 
49
KEITH
2000-10-01
35
H.Cat.3 
120
News 1
News 2
News 3
News 4
News 5
News 6
50
CHANTAL
2001-08-21
70
T.S.
60
News 1
News 2
51
IRIS
2001-10-09
80
H. Cat.4 
145
News 1
News 2
News 3
News 4
News 5
52
DEAN
2007-08-21
85
H. Cat 5
165
News 1
News 2
News 3
News 4
53
ARTHUR
2008-05-31
35
TS
40
News 1
News 2
NEWS 3
News 4
News 5
54       ALEX 2010   TS             60                    News  1
55     KARL 2010   TS    
56 MATTHEW 2010   TS    
56 RICHARD 2010   TH. Cat 1    

H= Hurricane

TS= Tropical Storm

Cat= Category on Saffir-Simpson Scale

Here is a very interesting 31mb (large download) PDF about Hurricane Hattie. There is a very interesting section on Ray Auxillou controlling Caye Caulker after Hurricane Hattie, Starts on Page 65 of the pdf file. CLICK HERE for the 31mb download.





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