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Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #532460
09/25/18 05:27 AM
09/25/18 05:27 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, August 2018

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

Climatologically speaking, August is known for its two weeks dry spell known locally as the "maga season". As a result, a marked drop in rainfall can be seen around August when looking at the annual rainfall distribution for the country. Weather systems that typically affect Belize during the month of August are Tropical Waves (TWs), Tropical Upper Tropospheric Troughs (TUTTs) and an occasional Tropical Cyclone (TCs) (tropical depression, tropical storm or hurricane).

August 2018 was unusually wet over central coastal areas (Belize District) and southern areas (southern Toledo district). The north and northwestern portions ( Corozal, northwest Orange Walk and Northwest Cayo) were dryer than normal while the remainder of the country saw rainfall totals within their normal range.

Although a couple tropical waves crossed the country during the first five days (2nd and 4th) of August 2018, rainfall was typically less than 1 inch per day for most areas. One exception was southern Belize where some showers and thunderstorms on the night of the 1st through early morning on the 2nd produced up to 87 mm of rainfall in Punta Gorda. However, in general upper level conditions supported a generally convergent and subsident pattern at the mid to upper levels during this period. This was produced by ridging to the west of the area and the axis of a TUTT east of the country. Overall showers and thunderstorms were generally isolated. Activity was diurnal with slightly more affecting the south during the nighttime and inland areas during the afternoon hours.

Upper level conditions changed gradually during the period from the 6th to the 8th of August as the axis of the TUTT slowly shifted north and west of the area. The south was first to experience divergent conditions aloft. This resulted in showers and thunderstorms on the 6th which produced up to 57.0 mm of rainfall in Punta Gorda. The activity shifted northward during the next couple of days with the airport receiving 40.4 mm on the 7th and 51.6 mm on the 8th. The activity on the 8th was due to the passage of a tropical wave under the aforementioned favourable upper dynamics resulting in deep-layered moisture and instability over the area. Moisture decreased gradually on the 9th.

Conditions were generally fair across the country between the 10th and 12th of August. However, nighttime showers and thunderstorms continued affecting the south producing approximately 1 inch of rainfall per day during this period.

Conditions became more moist and unstable on the 13th with a few showers and thunderstorms across the country. Highest amounts were once again recorded in Punta Gorda with 80 mm of rainfall. This activity decreased on the 14th and generally fair weather was experienced on the 15th. A weak tropical wave crossed that day but did not produce any significant rainfall across the country.

The upper levels became gradually more divergent during the next few days from the 16th to the 18th resulting in some showers, thunderstorms and periods of rain over most areas by the 18th. Activity was once again highest over the south where Punta Gorda recorded 67.8 mm and 47.0 mm of rainfall on the 17th and 18th, respectively.

Relatively moist conditions persisted for the following few days from the 19th to the 24th. Tropical waves crossed the country on the 19th, 21st and 23rd of the month. However, activity over the country was generally diurnal with showers occurring mainly over southern and coastal areas during the late night to early morning hours and inland areas during the afternoon hours with peak daytime heating.

A stronger tropical wave crossed the country on the 25th under very favourable upper level conditions supporting a further increase in moisture over the country. This resulted in torrential rainfall over the south on the night of the 25th which caused flooding and road closures. Records from Punta Gorda show a total of 174.6 mm of rainfall on the 24th and an additional 87.6 mm on the 25th. This activity then moved up to central areas of the country (Belize City/ Ladyville area) on Sunday 26th August where a total of 160.5 mm of rainfall was recorded at the airport. It is worth noting that this single amount of rainfall, which fell within a few hours, is just over an inch short of the typical August average for the airport which is 193.7 mm.

A couple tropical waves crossed the country during the period from August 27th to 29th causing relatively moist conditions to persist over the area and producing a few showers and thunderstorms across the country but mostly over the south. Conditions, then, became generally fair during the last two days of the month.

Based on analyses from the National Hurricane Center a total of 10 tropical waves crossed the country during the month of August 2018. The strongest of these was the wave that crossed on the 25th with a moisture plume trailing behind causing intense activity through to the 26th (see the discussion above).

The graph and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of August 2018. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, August 2018 was unusually wet over central coastal areas (Belize District) and southern areas (southern Toledo district). The north and northwestern portions ( Corozal, northwest Orange Walk and Northwest Cayo) were dryer than normal while the remainder of the country saw rainfall totals within their normal range. In terms of maximum temperatures, most of the stations sampled here saw slightly below normal maximum temperature in August 2018. The only exception was Pomona. Meanwhile nighttime temperatures were slightly warmer than normal for most stations except for Pomona and Punta Gorda.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures



Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #532729
10/12/18 05:16 AM
10/12/18 05:16 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, September 2018

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

September is typically a wet month for the country of Belize. It also coincides with the peak of the Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season and a significant amount of the historical tropical cyclones that have affected the country occurred during the month of September. Apart from tropical cyclones, other systems that typically affect Belize during the month of September include tropical waves, Tropical Upper Troposheric Troughs (TUTTs) and at times cold fronts and frontal shear lines affect the country as early as September.

September 2018 was drier than normal for most of the country, except the extreme west-central areas and the south. The month started off generally fair with showers and isolated thunderstorms confined to the Maya Mountains. Moisture increased slightly on the 2nd with the approach of a tropical wave. The wave crossed early on the 3rd and moisture in its wake supported a few showers and isolated thunderstorms. Conditions continued relatively moist during the night of the 3rd through early morning on the 4th with moisture decreasing thereafter.

Conditions were relatively dry from the 5th to the 7th. A slack pressure pattern over the area supported light easterly winds and subsequently warm conditions, especially in the interior. The result was mainly fair weather with isolated showers and thunderstorms inland during the afternoon due to daytime heating. Weak tropical waves crossed the country overnight between the 5th and 6th and again on the 7th but they did not have significant upper level support to produce organized convection over the area.

Moisture started to increase over the area on the 8th and this was associated mostly with a TUTT. By the 9th this system was supporting an induced trof across the northwest Caribbean Sea. This supported a relatively moist easterly flow over the area and resulted in a few showers and isolated thunderstorms mainly over northern and central areas. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) analyzed this system as a tropical wave which they had passing the country at around 18Z (12 midday) on the 9th. However, by the 10th they had the induced trof over the northwest Caribbean just north of northeastern Honduras. Moisture increased further on the 10th when an imbedded 1009mb low pressure system was analyzed along the axis of the trof. Showers and thunderstorms continued affecting mainly northern and inland areas. By the 11th the axis of the trof moved north to northern Yucatan but a very moist pattern continued in its wake. Subsequently showers and thunderstorms persisted over the country through to the 12th.

A relatively dry pattern became established across the country from the 13th through to the 18th of September 2018. This period was characterized by a slack pressure pattern and light winds over the area. Meanwhile at the upper levels a neutral to weakly convergent pattern prevailed inhibiting organized deep convective activity over the area. Showers and thunderstorms were generally isolated with occasionally a few more affecting southern areas.

Moisture increased on the 19th with the approach of a surface trof linked to the remnants of tropical storm Isaac over the area. This feature crossed the country slowly that day supporting an increase in cloudiness, showers and thunderstorms. Moisture continued relatively high the following day with showers and thunderstorms persisting especially over southern and inland areas.

A further increase in moisture was noted on the 21st and 22nd. This was associated with the slow approach of a tropical wave combined with increasing divergence at the upper levels. This resulted in a steady increase in showers and thunderstorms across the country. The tropical wave crossed overnight between the 22nd and 23rd and upper divergence peaked over the area between the 23rd and 24th. The upper system was a TUTT with axis west of the area supporting the divergent southwesterly flow aloft. As a result wet conditions persisted over the country.

Weather conditions continued relatively moist during the final week of September 2018 even though no tropical wave crossed until the 29th. A relatively moist easterly to east-northeasterly flow dominated. Additionally, the upper levels were generally divergent during this period and this provided the support for some convective activity over the area. This resulted a in a few showers and thunderstorms across the country for the remainder of the month.

In summary, although the month of September 2018 saw many wet days, these wet days were not intense enough to produce normal or above normal rainfall for most of the country. On the contrary, most areas of the country experienced below normal rainfall except over west-central and southern areas where rainfall was normal to slightly above normal. The graph and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of September 2018. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal for most of the country, except for southwestern Cayo district and the Toledo district. In terms of maximum temperatures, four of the stations sampled here saw above normal maximum temperature in September 2018 while one was normal and the other four were slightly below normal. Meanwhile minimum/nighttime temperatures were more or less normal for most of the stations except Punta Gorda where the minimum was significantly lower than usual.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: September 2018 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: September 2018 (% Above/Below Average)



Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #533234
11/13/18 05:46 AM
11/13/18 05:46 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, October 2018

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

October is typically the wettest month for the country of Belize. Systems that usually affect the country during this month include tropical waves and Tropical Upper Tropospheric Troughs (TUTTs). On occasions a tropical cyclone may affect the country during October. Cold fronts often affect the country during this month as well.

Moisture gradually increased across the country during the first week of October 2018. An increasingly moist northeasterly airflow at the low levels coupled with weakly divergent conditions aloft supported shower and thunderstorm development. This was associated with a broad trough of low pressure (remnants of Tropical Storm Kirk) that slowly approached the country. This system would eventually be near northeastern Honduras by the 5th of October. By the following day (October 6th) it was designated as potential tropical cyclone fourteen and it was centered just east of northern Belize. This resulted in cloudy skies with some showers and thunderstorms across the country.

The system became Tropical Storm Michael on the 7th and it was heading generally North-Northwestward away from Belize. With the system intensifying over the following few days it basically absorbed most of the moisture in the region resulting in a general drying trend across the country. Moreover, it supported a South-Southwesterly flow which was devoid of the deep-layered moisture that is typically associated with such flows. This may have been a result of adiabatic compression on the lee side of the mountains along the continental divide in Central America coupled with generally convergent/subsident conditions associated with the outflow from Michael. As a result conditions became very warm and mostly dry 8th and 9th with only isolated afternoon thunderstorms inland. Thunderstorm activity was much stronger and widespread on the afternoon of the 10th prompting the issuance of a severe thunderstorms alert.

Relatively moist conditions persisted over the area for the following few days. The country continued under a generally slack pressure pattern which supported only light winds. A few showers and isolated thunderstorms affected mainly the Maya Mountains on the 11th and decreased even further on the 12th and 13th. A light and relatively moist east to northeasterly airflow on the 14th supported a few showers mostly over the Maya Mountains and over the sea.

Moisture increased on the 15th with a low pressure area over northeast Honduras moving generally westward toward Belize. The National Hurricane Center contemplated declaring this system a potential tropical cyclone but eventually decided against it due to its trajectory that was expected to take it mostly over land or very near the coast of northern Honduras. This system crossed southern Belize the following day (16th October) and supported some showers and periods of rain across the country. Relatively moist conditions lingered behind this system producing a few showers and isolated thunderstorms across the country from the 17th through to the 19th.

A drier air mass moved over the area on the 20th of October. This relatively dry trend persisted through to the 25th of October. As a result weather conditions were generally fair across the country with isolated showers and isolated thunderstorms. There were occasional exceptions over the south where slightly higher amounts were noted.

A cold front became stationary north of the country over Yucatan on the 26th and caused a slight increase in moisture over the area through to the 27th. This increase in moisture did not produce any significant widespread increase in rainfall but instead shower activity remained generally isolated.

A relatively moist northeasterly flow developed behind the dissipating stationary front on the 28th and produced a few showers over northern and inland areas of the country. Similar activity continued on the 29th. Showers and rain then spread to central and southern overnight between the 29th and 30th. Finally, the moisture would increase further on the last day of the month supporting some showers, thunderstorms and periods of rain mostly over northern and central areas of the country.

The graph and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of October 2018. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was generally normal for most of the country, except for the north and southeast coast (Savannah) where it was slightly below normal and parts of the central areas (northwestern Cayo and North Stann Creek) where rainfall was above normal. In terms of maximum temperatures, most of the stations sampled here show above normal maximum/daytime temperature, except for the Belize Zoo. Nighttime/minimum temperatures were also higher than normal for most areas except for Punta Gorda which recorded lower than normal minimum temperatures.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: October 2018 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: October 2018 (% Above/Below Average)



Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #533694
12/08/18 05:36 AM
12/08/18 05:36 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, November 2018

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

November is the last month of the Atlantic basin hurricane season. For Belize it is a month in which the climate of the country transitions gradually from the rainy season to the cooler transition period between December and January. Therefore, it is a month in which the country is affected from both tropical systems such as tropical waves and possible tropical cyclones as well as frontal systems.

November 2018 started off generally fair. A cold front over the Gulf of Mexico and ridging northeast of the area supported a dry easterly to southeasterly airflow on the first day. This became a bit more easterly on day two as northern and inland portions of the country experienced a few showers and isolated thunderstorms due to the proximity of the front over northern Yucatan. Moisture increased further on the 3rd and 4th as the stationary front lingered just north of the area supporting a few showers and isolated thunderstorms across the country.

Conditions became generally fair once more on the 5th and 6th of the month as the remnants of the front drifted north and a drier easterly to east-southeasterly airflow dominated. Meanwhile a weak tropical wave was gradually approaching. On the morning of November 7th the axis of the tropical wave was located near 82W. The wave crossed late on the 7th into early morning on the 8th supporting a few overnight showers that lasted into the morning of the 8th.

The following few days from the 9th through to the 12th of November 2018 was characterized by generally fair weather with isolated showers. The upper levels in particular were very dry and hostile to any significant convective development during this period. A weak tropical wave crossed on the morning of November 11th but did not produce any significant increase in rainfall totals and only a modest increase in the coverage of isolated showers across the country.

The approach and passage of a cold front eventually ended the relatively dry spell described above. On the 13th, the front was located over the Bay of Campeche. Moisture convergence ahead of this system produced a few showers over inland and southern areas on that day with isolated thunderstorms during the night. Moisture increased further on the 14th as the front extended across northern Yucatan. A few showers and periods of rain affected mainly northern and inland areas on that day spreading to coastal areas during the night as the cold front crossed the country. The 15th was cloudy and cool in the wake of the cold front with light rain mainly offshore and over central parts of the country. The following day continued cloudy and cool but with little to no rainfall.

The remnants of the front in the form of a surface trof slowly began to drift back towards the country during the following few days. This supported rainfall activity mainly over the south and offshore areas at first. As a result the 17th was cloudy and cool with light rain mainly over the sea and along southern coastal areas. By the 18th, showers and periods of rain extended to central and southern areas with thunderstorms offshore.

Showery activity persisted and intensified somewhat during the following few days from the 19th peaking around the 21st and 22nd. It is worth noting that over 4 inches of rainfall was recorded at the Airport on the 21st which resulted in localized flooding in the area.

Rainfall activity gradually decreased on the 23rd and 24th with the weather becoming mostly fair on the 24th. Fair conditions persisted for the following two days (25th and 26th) as a dry southeasterly airflow prevailed over the area.

A cold front just north of northern Belize and a trof just east of the country changed weather conditions over the country on the 27th. These features supported an increase in moisture which resulted in a few overnight showers over the Toledo district and a few showers, thunderstorms and rain over the mainland and southern areas during the day. The front became stationary over central Belize on the 28th supporting cloudy and cool conditions with showers and light rain mainly over the sea and coast during the morning and then over central and northern areas in the afternoon. The frontal system retrogressed northward while slowly dissipating on the 29th producing showers and light rain over the Orange Walk and Corozal districts. By the 30th, the country saw a return to generally fair weather with only a few showers lingering over the north during the morning.

The graph and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of November 2018. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was generally normal for most of the southern two-thirds of the country. However, there are a couple exceptions. One is the west (Spanish Lookout and Central Farm area) where rainfall totals were around 25-55% above normal for the month and the other is the Stann Creek Valley (Pomona) area where totals were slightly below normal. No manual observations were available from the north at the time of this report. Preliminary (un-validated) data from automatic weather stations suggests that rainfall totals were significantly below normal in that area. In terms of maximum temperatures, most of the stations sampled here show above normal maximum/daytime temperature, except Central Farm where the average maximum temperature for the month was near normal and Savannah where the data suggests slightly cooler daytime temperature than normal. Nighttime/minimum temperatures were also slightly higher than normal for most areas except for Punta Gorda and Pomona.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: November 2018 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: November 2018 (% Above/Below Average)



Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #534265
01/11/19 05:40 AM
01/11/19 05:40 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, December 2018

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

December marks the first month of the cool transition period between the rainy season and the dry season for Belize. This transition period typically lasts for about two to three months before the dry season sets in between mid February and early March. December is typically cool over the country with the main rainfall producers being cold fronts, prefrontal troughs and shear lines.

December 2018 started off dry and unseasonably warm. A moderate but slightly gusty easterly to southeasterly airflow prevailed for the first few days and supported these conditions. A cold front dipped as far south as northern Yucatan on the 5th and then moved into the extreme northwest Caribbean to just north of Belize on the 6th. The high pressure ridge behind this front moved off the the east and induced a relatively moist easterly to northeasterly flow on the 6th which supported a few showers mostly over northern, central and inland areas of the country. A few showers persisted over central and northern areas on the 7th, becoming isolated on the 8th and 9th, except for a few more over the south and over the Maya Mountains on the 9th.

The first cold front for the month crossed the country on the 10th. The prefrontal trough on the night of the 9th and early morning of the 10th supported a few showers mainly over northern and central areas of the country. The passage of the front later in the day of the 10th supported a few showers, isolated thunderstorms and light rain mostly over the sea. Fair, cool and mostly dry conditions prevailed over the country on the 11th and the day of 12th in the wake of the cold front. Light rain affected the Belize City and offshore areas on the night of the 12th through early morning of the 13th but conditions became fair once more by daybreak on the 13th and continued that way for the remainder of the day.

The second cold front for the month crossed on the night of the 14th. The passage of this front produced only a few light showers. The most significant weather with this system was strong and gusty winds with gusts of up to 30 knots recorded at the Municipal Airport in Belize City. The front had swept through by the morning of the 15th with fair and cool conditions dominating that day. No significant rainfall was reported.

Generally fair, cool and dry conditions persisted the following few days from the 16th through to the 19th except over the sea where a few showers developed on the 18th. This activity affected the San Pedro area with the automatic weather station recording 22.2 mm of rainfall on the 18th. Isolated showers affected the country on the afternoon of the 20th with the approach of yet another cold front. This cold front (the third for the month) crossed on the night of the 20th/early morning on the 21st. As the 3rd front for the month swept past, it ushered in another period of cool and mostly dry conditions in its wake that lasted until the 23rd. No significant rainfall was noted during this period.

Moisture started to increase over the country on the 23rd as the front began to retrogress towards the country. The activity started over the south where very light and brief showers were noted on the 23rd. Notably the automatic weather station in Placencia reported rainfall total of 61.0 mm on the 23rd while the station at Punta Gorda reported 22.8 mm on that day. By the 24th (Christmas Eve) some showers, periods of rain and isolated thunderstorms affected most of the country, but especially northern, central areas and the eastern slopes of the Maya Mountains. Heaviest activity occurred over Belize City with the station at the Municipal Airport reporting 95.6 mm of rainfall and that at Port of Belize reporting 82.9 mm. Activity decreased a bit on Christmas day. However, a few showers still lingered on and persisted through to the 26th.

Finally, the month of December ended off the way it started. A tight pressure gradient became established between the Atlantic High Pressure system (Bermuda High) northeast of the area and low pressures over the northwest Gulf of Mexico. This supported a gusty and mostly dry easterly to southeasterly airflow straight through to the end of the month. Except for occasional light and brief isolated showers, little to no rainfall was noted during this period.

The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of December 2018. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal for the southern two-thirds of the country while it was near normal from Belize City northward. In terms of maximum temperatures, most of the stations sampled here show above normal maximum/daytime temperatures, except for Savannah where the average maximum temperature for the month was slightly below normal and the Airport where the average maximum for the month was just about normal. Nighttime/minimum temperatures were also slightly higher than normal for most areas except for Punta Gorda and Pomona where nighttime temperatures were slightly cooler than normal and Central Farm where they were near normal.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: December 2018 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: December 2018 (% Above/Below Average)



Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #534779
02/08/19 05:43 AM
02/08/19 05:43 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, January 2019

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

January falls within the cool transition period between the rainy season and the dry season for Belize. This transition period typically lasts for about two to three months from December to about mid February or early March when the dry season sets in. January is typically cool over the country and can be somewhat wet at times. The main rainfall producers during this month are cold fronts, prefrontal troughs and shear lines.

The first day of January 2019 started off a bit moist as a few showers affected the country with highest concentration over the south. This was supported by a slightly moist easterly airflow. Conditions improved later in the day and only isolated showers prevailed for the next few days from the 2nd to the 5th.

Moisture increased across the country on the 6th in association with a weak frontal boundary that dipped south and became quasi-stationary near Belize's northern border. Highest rainfall was concentrated over northern offshore areas with the automatic weather station in San Pedro recording 35.2 mm on the 6th. This system lingered over the area for the next few days supporting a few showers and isolated thunderstorms over most areas on the 7th. Showers increased on the 8th with most stations recording some rainfall, except for those in the extreme south. Similar conditions persisted on the 9th. However, by the 10th the frontal boundary began to drift south as a high pressure system was building southward from the north. This caused the focus of rainfall to shift offshore with showers becoming generally isolated over the mainland.

By the 11th, the weak frontal boundary had moved south of the area and a high pressure ridge dominated. This supported mild and mostly fair weather for the next three days from the 11th to the 13th.

Moisture started to increase once more over the area on the 14th with the approach of another cold front. This supported the development of a few showers over the country with highest concentrations in the north. The weak frontal boundary slowed down over our area supporting moist conditions on the 15th with some showers and rain mostly over central and northern areas of the country. Highest rainfall total was recorded at the airport with over two inches of rainfall. Rainfall decreased on the 16th as the frontal boundary drifted south of the country.

Fair and generally mild conditions prevailed on the 17th with no significant rainfall across the country. The following day continued generally fair with only isolated showers and then moisture increased slightly on the 19th and supported a few morning showers mostly over the sea and south.

A relatively strong cold front raced across the Gulf of Mexico between the 19th and 20th and crossed Belize between 6 am and midday on the 20th. This supported cloudy and cool conditions on the 20th. However, moisture was limited with this system and showers were isolated at most. The 21st was variably cloudy, cool and mostly dry with little to no rainfall recorded across the country.

Remnant moisture from the retrogressing frontal boundary drifted across the country during the following few days from the 22nd to the 25th supporting mostly light showers and periods of rain over some areas. Rainfall accumulations were generally low with less than 5 mm per day. The 26 and the 27th were generally fair with isolated showers. However, the fourth cold front for the month was rapidly approaching on Sunday the 27th. This was a relatively strong and fast moving front. When it crossed the country late on Sunday the 27th, it supported strong winds with gust up to 37 knots. However, because of its fast pace, rainfall was minimal.

A high pressure ridge dominated during the following few days from the 28th through to 30th in the wake of the cold front and supported mild and generally fair weather over the country with no significant rainfall. The final day of January 2019 saw a slight increase in moisture over southern areas of the country where a few light showers were noted. Generally fair weather continued elsewhere.

The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of January 2019. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal for most of country except in the extreme north where it was near normal. Some areas over central and southern Belize saw rainfall as low as 80% below normal. In terms of maximum temperatures, about half of the stations sampled here show above normal maximum/daytime temperatures with Melinda showing the warmest daytime temperatures for th month. The other stations saw near normal or slightly below normal maximum/daytime temperatures in January 2019. Nighttime/minimum temperatures were slightly lower than normal for most of the stations in this sample with Punta Gorda showing coolest nighttime conditions during January 2019.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: January 2019 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: January 2019 (% Above/Below Average)


National Meteorological Service of Belize


Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #535266
03/08/19 06:04 AM
03/08/19 06:04 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

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Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, February 2019

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

February typically marks the beginning of the dry season for the country. Temperatures normally start increasing as the month is characterized by a warm easterly to southeasterly surface airflow. Whatever limited rainfall that occurs during the month is typically associated with one or two cold fronts, prefrontal trofs, shear lines and low level easterly wind surges.

February 2019 started off mainly fair and characteristically dry across the country. Except for light isolated showers over the south during the first week of the month, very little rainfall occurred across the remainder of the country. Highest one day rainfall total based on automatic weather stations data was over Punta Gorda on the 3rd when 16.6 mm of rainfall was recorded. The low levels were dominated by a dry easterly to southeasterly flow during the period while a dry subsident pattern prevailed at the upper levels.

Moisture increased slightly over the area on the 8th as winds shifted to the east-northeast. This supported a few showers over southern, central and inland areas of the country. This activity increased further on the 9th with some showers noted across much of the country. Rainfall remained relatively high overnight on the 9th through early morning on the 10th and decreased later in the day as a drier easterly to southeasterly airflow became established over the area.

A diurnal pattern of increasing moisture during the late night to early morning hours on the 11th and 12th supported a few showers and then the only cold front for February 2019 crossed on the 13th. This weak cold front supported a few showers over the northern districts of the country that day.

Moisture decreased on the 14th and continued very low through to the 20th of the month. This period was characterized by warm, hazy and dry conditions across the country. Although, moisture increased slightly in the boundary layer after the 20th, this increase was only enough to clear the haze and no significant rainfall was noted across the country. The month ended mostly dry.

The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of February 2019. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal over the Stann Creek, Belize and most of the Cayo District while over the Toledo district rainfall was near normal. The northern parts of the country (Corozal and northern Orange Walk district) saw above normal rainfall during February 2019. Maximum/daytime temperatures were warmer than usual while nighttime (minimum) temperatures were normal to slightly above normal during February 2019.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: February 2019 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: February 2019 (% Above/Below Average)


National Meteorological Service of Belize


Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #535831
04/11/19 05:35 AM
04/11/19 05:35 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

.
Marty  Offline OP

Monthly Weather Summary, March 2019

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

March is usually a warm, dry and windy month across the country of Belize. A gusty easterly to southeasterly wind normally prevails throughout much of the month supporting warm and fair conditions. Whatever limited rainfall that occurs during the month is typically associated with one or two cold fronts, prefrontal trofs, shear lines and low level easterly wind surges.

March 2019 was characteristically warm and generally dry. However, it was not as windy as normal and the prevailing surface flow was more easterly than east-southeasterly. The month started off generally fair with very limited rainfall amounts being recorded during the first five days. This was supported by mostly convergent, subsident and dry conditions at the mid to upper levels of the atmosphere.

Conditions changed slightly on the 6th due to the approach and slow passage of a weak frontal boundary. This system produced some rainfall on the 6th and again on the 7th. By late evening on the 8th the remnants/tail-end of the front had dissipated over the Gulf of Honduras and generally fair conditions returned.

The country saw generally fair weather for the next ten days from the 10th to the 19th. The surface flow alternated between east-southeasterly and east-northeasterly but overall the pattern was dry throughout the atmosphere. Isolated showers occurred sporadically during this period but daily accumulations were below 2 mm at most stations with only a few exceptions.

The approach of another cold front on the 20th supported a slight increase in moisture. Rainfall peaked at Spanish Lookout on that day with a total of 41.1 mm. Punta Gorda was a close second with 37.3 mm of rainfall. Shower activity was slightly more widespread the following day on the 21st. By this time the diffused frontal boundary was over the country and supported shower activity especially over southern coastal areas. Automatic weather station data from Placencia showed a total of 96.6 mm being recorded between 12 am on the 21st and 11:55 pm that day. A few showers continued mainly along the eastern slopes of the Maya Mountains on the 22nd.

The remainder of the month saw a return to mainly fair and dry conditions except on the 27th and 28th when a few showers affected southern portions of the country. This activity was supported by a slightly moist northeasterly airflow.

In summary one weak cold front crossed the country slowly between the 7-8th March 2019 while another diffused frontal boundary stalled over the area around the 20th - 21st March 2019. Rainfall activity between the 27-28th was indirectly related to a front that passes just north of the area and the ridge behind it supported a relatively moist northeasterly airflow.

The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of March 2019. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal over the Corozal District and most of the Orange Walk and Belize Districts as well. In Cayo, Belmopan saw below normal rainfall while Central Farm was near normal but Spanish Lookout was above normal. In the Stann creek District, Savannah, which falls near the border between the Stann Creek and Toledo District was below normal but Melinda near the coast was above normal. Meanwhile rainfall over Punta Gorda was above normal for March 2019. Maximum/daytime temperatures were warmer than usual for most of the stations sampled except in Punta Gorda and Savannah where daytime temperatures were a bit cooler than normal. Meanwhile nighttime (minimum) temperatures were normal to slightly above normal during March 2019 for all stations sampled here except for Central Farm where nighttime temperatures were a bit cooler than normal.

Monthly Rainfall Summary


Monthly Maximum Temperatures


Monthly Minimum Temperatures


Rainfall Observed: March 2019 (mm)


Rainfall Observed: March 2019 (% Above/Below Average)


National Meteorological Service of Belize


Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #536346
05/16/19 05:45 AM
05/16/19 05:45 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

.
Marty  Offline OP
Monthly Weather Summary, April 2019

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

April is climatologically the driest month of the year in Belize. The month is characterized by dry, warm and hazy conditions. An occasional late-season cold front may cross country. Whenever such systems cross at this time of the year, they typically produce very intense thunderstorm activity.

The first four days in April 2019 was mostly dry across the country. Slack pressure patterns supported a light easterly to southeasterly surface flow on the first day. Only light isolated showers were observed. The flow became more easterly to east-northeasterly the following few days but conditions remained mostly dry. The dry conditions were interrupted slightly on the fifth when a few showers and possible isolated thunderstorms affected the extreme south. A return to mainly fair weather was noted on the 6th and 7th.

Moisture increased over the country on April 8th. Afternoon showers and thunderstorms were noted over the Maya Mountains and other areas in the Toledo district. A further increase in moisture occurred on the 9th due to a stationary front over Yucatan with a prefrontal trof over the northwest Caribbean Sea. This system produced a few showers and isolated thunderstorms mostly over northern areas in the morning shifting southwards late in the evening. Synoptic analysis over the area suggests that the front actually crossed during the late night hours of the 9th into the 10th and stalled just south of Belize where it rapidly dissipated.

Conditions became dry across the country on the 10th with little to no rainfall observed. A high pressure system over the Central Gulf of Mexico that day favoured a light easterly flow. The flow became more east-southeasterly the following day supporting mainly fair, warm and dry conditions. A similar pattern prevailed for the following few days.

A weak cold front dipped south, crossing Yucatan late on the 14th and extending to central Belize by early morning on the 15th. This supported strong thunderstorms just north and west of Belize's border on the 14th with moderate shower and thunderstorm activity mostly over inland areas of the country the following day (15th). The frontal boundary retrogressed northward the following day but residual moisture over the area favour isolated showers mostly over central areas of the country. This activity persisted mainly over the northern half of the country on the 17th.

The 18th saw a return to mainly fair and dry conditions over the area with little to no rainfall noted. A gusty southeasterly surface flow was noted between the Atlantic high pressure ridge northeast of the area and yet another cold front approaching from the northwest Gulf of Mexico. By the 19th the cold front was already over Yucatan with prefrontal trof extending to northwest Belize. This system only produced isolated showers and thunderstorms over northern and western areas of the country. The cold front crossed overnight on the 19th and by early morning of the 20th it extended from the Gulf of Honduras northeast to western Cuba and beyond. Areas of rain with embedded showers were noted mainly over central and southern areas of the Country during the night into early morning with conditions becoming fair and relatively cool later in the day of the 20th.

Remnant moisture from the dissipating frontal boundary produced isolated showers over the south on the 21st and a few showers over central and northern areas on the 22nd. Thereafter, no significant feature affected the country for the remainder of the month. Conditions were generally dry with only isolated showers affecting the country. Additionally, isolated afternoon thunderstorms popped up over the Maya Mountains on the 25th, 27th and 29th.

The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of April 2019. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal over most areas of the country except for central coastal Belize where rainfall was well above average. The Belize Zoo, Melinda and Belmopan recorded rainfall totals more than twice their normal. The situation was the reverse in the extreme west where both Central Farm and Spanish Lookout registered less than half the normal rainfall amounts for the month. Maximum/daytime temperatures were warmer than usual for all of the stations sampled here. Meanwhile nighttime (minimum) temperatures were normal to slightly above normal during April 2019 for all stations sampled here except for Central Farm and Melinda where nighttime temperatures were a bit cooler than normal.

Monthly Rainfall Summary

[Linked Image]

Monthly Maximum Temperatures

[Linked Image]

Monthly Minimum Temperatures

[Linked Image]

Re: Monthly Weather Summary [Re: Marty] #536690
06/07/19 06:05 AM
06/07/19 06:05 AM
Joined: Oct 1999
Posts: 68,047
oregon, spr
Marty Offline OP

.
Marty  Offline OP
Monthly Weather Summary, May 2019

National Meteorological Service of Belize

Monthly weather summaries are prepared by the climate section of the National Meteorological Service (NMS) of Belize. The NMS of Belize maintains a network of over 25 weather stations that are situated primarily in the agricultural regions of the country. Temperature and rainfall are read at 9 am each morning and the rainfall total read at this time represents the accumulated rainfall for the previous day.

Climatologically May is the warmest month of the year in Belize. The first part of the month is typically characterized by warm, dry and hazy conditions. However, this month is also the transition month from the dry to the wet season across the country. Therefore, the rains usually start in the south after the first week of May and gradually make their way northwards.

Weather conditions across the country in May started out warm and mostly dry. A moderate easterly to southeasterly surface flow prevailed during the first week of the month supported by relatively tight pressure gradients between the Atlantic high pressure ridge and thermal trofs/lows over Mexico. The mid to upper levels were mostly dry. Showers were generally isolated during the first two days, followed by little to no rainfall from the 3rd through to the 5th, except for isolated afternoon thunderstorms inland. Rain and thunderstorms affected central and southern areas on the night of the 5th through early morning on the 6th supported by a relatively divergent southwesterly flow aloft. Warm and mostly dry conditions returned for the remainder of the 6th through to the 7th.

The second week of May 2019 started out cloudy but with no significant rainfall. The cloudiness was due mostly to the advection of mid to high level layered cloud over the area from thunderstorm activity over southern Mexico and Guatemala. Seasonably warm, hazy and dry conditions persisted on the 9th. The 10th, 11th and 12th saw isolated afternoon thunderstorms over the mountains with little to no rain elsewhere. A weak surface trof was analyzed near the cost of Belize on the 12th but this feature was shallow and did not produce any significant weather across the country. A similar trend continued through to the 14th to close out the second week of the month.

The main synoptic pattern to start of the third week of May 2019 consisted of a stationary front well north of Belize over the eastern Gulf of Mexico and southern Florida while a weak surface trof was further south over the western Gulf and Bay of Campeche. This pattern supported a moderate easterly surface flow over the area. Brief and very light isolated showers were noted overnight with mostly warm, hazy and dry conditions during the day of the 15th with only isolated afternoon thunderstorms over the Maya Mountains. A similar trend continued through to the 19th of May. On the 20th isolated showers developed in the extreme north as well as the south while the 21st saw mainly fair weather except for isolated showers over the south during the early morning hours.

Moisture gradually increased over the area during the fourth week of May 2019 signaling that conditions were starting to transition from the dry to the wet season. A broad low was developing over the eastern Pacific which was supporting the advection of deep moisture from the Pacific into Central America. Weather conditions over Belize remained generally fair on the 22nd. Showers were generally isolated that day and affected mostly central areas of the country. The 23rd saw a slight increase in shower activity with a few showers affecting the coast during the morning and most areas by the afternoon. By the following day some showers affected the southern half of the country. The following days (25th to 28th) saw a few showers affecting mainly southern areas of the country. Again this suggested that the rainy season had started in the south. Showers, however, were not confined only to the south during this period.

Moisture decreased a bit on the 29th however isolated and thunderstorms still affected the Toledo district overnight on the 28th through early morning on the 29th. Thunderstorms were also noted over the Maya Mountains on the afternoon of the 29th. The main feature continued to be the broad cyclonic gyre encompassing most of Central America and the eastern Pacific. The 30th saw isolated showers and thunderstorms once more over areas along the western border and over the Maya Mountains. Finally, a further increase in moisture was noted on last day of May 2019. This factor coupled with very divergent upper level conditions supported the development of a few showers and thunderstorms especially in the north, over the Maya Mountains and also along the coast of the country.

In summary May 2019 was characteristically warm, hazy and mostly dry. However, the rainy season which usually starts at least by the 2nd week of May in the south was a bit late this year as it started well into the fourth week of May 2019. The graphs and maps below summarize the total rainfall and average maximum and minimum temperature recorded during the month of May 2019. They also give an indication of how these readings compare to the normal for the month across the stations sampled. As can be seen, rainfall was below normal over the north (Corozal District, Orange Walk and most of the Belize Districts). Rainfall was also above normal in parts of Cayo (Central Farm) and coastal Stann Creek district. Meanwhile rainfall was higher than normal over the Toledo district. Particularly in Punta Gorda rainfall was almost twice the normal for May 2019. Some areas saw near normal rainfall such as Belmopan and Savannah. Both daytime (maximum) and nighttime (minimum) temperatures were above normal for most of the stations sampled with only a few exceptions.

Monthly Rainfall Summary

[Linked Image]

Monthly Maximum Temperatures

[Linked Image]

Monthly Minimum Temperatures

[Linked Image]

Rainfall Observed: May 2019 (mm)

[Linked Image]

Rainfall Observed: May 2019 (% Above/Below Average)

[Linked Image]

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